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The Hebrew Music Museum

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TripAdvisor Reviews

TripAdvisor ReviewsBased on 75 traveler reviews
Amazing interactive museum! kids will enjoy the visit don't miss !
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on November 10, 2017

Visited the museum with my 9 year old daughter, we didn't take A guided tour and went ourselves using Ipad . I was pleased the museum is not loo large, Several rooms on 2 floors each room Dedicated to different area of the world where Jews of Diaspora lived - near every...

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Visited the museum with my 9 year old daughter, we didn't take A guided tour and went ourselves using Ipad . I was pleased the museum is not loo large, Several rooms on 2 floors each room Dedicated to different area of the world where Jews of Diaspora lived - near every exposition there is bar code you can scan the code and get explanation also hear the sound of instrument. also in different rooms there several interactive games and VR presentation of the temple. my daughter enjoined the visit i will defensively come again

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The Hebrew Music Museum
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on November 10, 2017

Beautifully done. This museum is not large, but in order to do it properly one needs a few hours. It can be done in less time, but not sure you would want to. There are 4 rooms each according to area of the world and date. The audio visual at the end is beyond...

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Beautifully done. This museum is not large, but in order to do it properly one needs a few hours. It can be done in less time, but not sure you would want to. There are 4 rooms each according to area of the world and date. The audio visual at the end is beyond anyone's expectation. It is first rate. There are a number of restaurants that are in the complex. A lovely way to finish. The street Yoel Solomon is a wonderful walking promenade, with fantastic artisans. Don't miss this one... Also not expensive!

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Second time here this year.
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on November 8, 2017

This museum is a gem unlike most others. Don't miss it. We came back on our following trip to Israel. Allow at least 1+ hours, more if you are a musician. Best to go when they have a tour in your language because they will let you touch and play...

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This museum is a gem unlike most others. Don't miss it. We came back on our following trip to Israel. Allow at least 1+ hours, more if you are a musician. Best to go when they have a tour in your language because they will let you touch and play some of the instruments.

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I would rename this The Musical Instruments of Some Areas of Diaspora Jewry Museum
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on November 8, 2017

I visited the Hebrew Music Museum (HMM) on a recent trip to Jerusalem during which this was one of a number of local museums visited. I saved this one for last as both the details on the website and the concept of a Hebrew music museum were very appealing. The museum consists of...

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I visited the Hebrew Music Museum (HMM) on a recent trip to Jerusalem during which this was one of a number of local museums visited. I saved this one for last as both the details on the website and the concept of a Hebrew music museum were very appealing. The museum consists of a number of rooms or areas corresponding with selected areas of the world in which the Jews of Diaspora lived in (notably there were no areas for North American or Israeli Jewry!) and a room which used visual and audio technology to give a fun and touching tour of the active first Temple (with a very minimal connection to music). I visited the museum with my very intelligent musical 11 year old niece. We chose to take the museum tour with a human guide rather than use the iPads to tour the museum. The museum is modern and is richly decorated to fit the themes of the various rooms. A large and diverse collection of mostly string and to a lesser extent wind and some percussion instruments are displayed. It was clearly an expensive and comprehensive effort that put together the collection of instruments. The guide’s function was primarily to pull out a selection of instruments, speak briefly about them, sound the instrument and use her iPad on which to play a lively piece of recorded music played on that instrument. Overall, we found the museum to be disappointing and dry. There was very little to revisit once the tour was completed and we were able to return to all the rooms at our leisure beyond taken more time to look at the instruments. With very few exceptions, the instruments were not to be touched by the guests. The couple of interactive games were weak and had nothing to do with music. The museum should have been called a “Musical Instruments of Some Areas of Diaspora Jewry Museum” as the preponderance of displays and information offered was of instruments. The guide was well trained with a script. However she did not display any enthusiasm or rich knowledge about the topic at hand. When asked why there was no area that dealt with the coming together of Jewish/Hebrew music of the Diaspora music in Israel; no area of Israeli music, the guide shrugged off the question. Similarly when asked what made the instruments of the various regions Jewish or Hebrew rather than just regional, she had no answer. The museum relies too much on technology and prettiness as its draw. It could have benefited from more meaningful curating and the use of guides with broad knowledge to present and educate about the rich world of music in the history of the Jewish people. It is of note that outside the museum down the road at intersection of Yoel Moshe Solomon Street and Yaffo sits a piano available for anyone to use. During my stay in Jerusalem each evening (and to a lesser extent during the day) there was consistently some random person sitting at that piano- always incredibly talented. The impromptu musicians played both Hebrew and Western songs, a diverse group of people always were clustered around singing along, shouting out requests, smiling, taking pictures, sometimes even dancing, clapping, cheering. I think this was far more of a Hebrew Music experience than anything displayed at the HMM.

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Not to Be Missed
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on October 23, 2017

This is a relatively new museum. The virtual reality visit to the Temple in the first room is amazing as is the use of technology throughout the museum. You'll see and learn about musical instruments you never imagined!

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