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L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art

  • 2 Hapalmach St, Jerusalem
  • L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art (Photo: Avshalom Avital).
  • L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art (Photo: Avshalom Avital and Daniela Golan).
  • L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art (Photo: Vadim Michaelov).
  • L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art (Photo: Shai Ben Efraim).
  • L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art (Photo: Shai Ben Efraim).
  • L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art (Photo: Hanan Bar Assouline).
  • L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art (Photo: Shai Ben Efraim).
  • L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art (Photo: Shai Ben Efraim).
  • L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art (Photo: Shai Ben Efraim).

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TripAdvisor Reviews

TripAdvisor ReviewsBased on 101 traveler reviews
Probably one of the finest specialty museums in the world
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on December 24, 2021

This magnificent museum, dedicated to the faith of Islam, its origins, culture, history, and art is a breathtaking display of artifacts, videos, and exhibits that takes the visitor along the impressive path of the faith which has today about a billion and a half followers. From the origins of the prophet Muhamad, the...

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This magnificent museum, dedicated to the faith of Islam, its origins, culture, history, and art is a breathtaking display of artifacts, videos, and exhibits that takes the visitor along the impressive path of the faith which has today about a billion and a half followers. From the origins of the prophet Muhamad, the split between the Sunni and Shia believers, the heyday of the Abassian khalifate to the Ottoman empire. Not too many people are familiar with the contribution of the Muslim world to mankind, from mathematics to Astronomy, literature, and philosophy. However, in addition, there is a special permanent exhibition of clocks and watches, notably the donation of the entire collection of Sir Lionel Salomons, a priceless collection of 191 clocks and watches, among them the Marie-Antoinette watch, crafted by the Swiss genius watchmaker Breguet, that took 20 years to make. There is an intriguing story to this world-class display as in 1983 over 100 watches of this collection were robbed, and only 23 years later the police got a break which resulted in the retrieval of 88 robbed watches. 13 still are unaccounted for. During our visit, the Coffee exhibition was also shown, in another marvelous way of telling everything about the "world drink", and the ways in which it is produced and consumed. In short, don't miss this museum which definitely should be on everyone's visiting Jerusalem "must-see" list. The admission fee for senior citizens is INS 27.

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Educational and eye opening
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on October 4, 2021

The initial educational video explains the basics of Islam. Then displays present the glory of Islam through breathtaking and inspirational artistic creations. Tip: free parking is available when dialing zero to security who gladly raise the barrier.

Grear for art lovers, not only of Islamic art
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on September 27, 2021

Incredible collections of XIth century silver artefacts (the Harrari collection,) so valuable that the Al Thani fund will present a part of it in Paris this coming year), a honorable and interesting array of Islamic art, and the HIGHLIGHT- the watches collection from Breguet and suc- breathtaking jewels of ingenuity and art, I think...

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Incredible collections of XIth century silver artefacts (the Harrari collection,) so valuable that the Al Thani fund will present a part of it in Paris this coming year), a honorable and interesting array of Islamic art, and the HIGHLIGHT- the watches collection from Breguet and suc- breathtaking jewels of ingenuity and art, I think more beautiful but comparable to Faberg'e eggs. We saw the coffee temporary exhibition of coffee artefacts and israli memorabilia- cute and a perfect family outing. Genya was a knowledgeable and interesting guide who made the tour lively and enriching, and later explained so many great tidbits about the other artefacts. We spent almost two hours, and time was short even for the youngest (8 ).

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