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Monastary of the Cross Jerusalem

  • The Valley of the Cross, Jerusalem

TripAdvisor Reviews

TripAdvisor ReviewsBased on 37 traveler reviews
Interesting Monastery
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on August 6, 2020

it started as a Georgian monastery and today is inhabited by russian monks and nuns, with a Greek Flag above them, it is extremely interesting to visit and has a very old mosaic in the main church. One of the many atractions in town, and is located, where the trees from where the Cross...

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it started as a Georgian monastery and today is inhabited by russian monks and nuns, with a Greek Flag above them, it is extremely interesting to visit and has a very old mosaic in the main church. One of the many atractions in town, and is located, where the trees from where the Cross of Christ was made.

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Honoring the Cross of Christ with a Monastery in its Memory
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on November 6, 2018

Sheltering in the valley below the Israel Museum, the Monastery of the Cross easily pre-dates the Museum. Both are worth a visit. The Monastery celebrates the tradition of the tree for the cross of Christ having grown in the valley in which the Monastery is situated. A small, fortified monastery originally...

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Sheltering in the valley below the Israel Museum, the Monastery of the Cross easily pre-dates the Museum. Both are worth a visit. The Monastery celebrates the tradition of the tree for the cross of Christ having grown in the valley in which the Monastery is situated. A small, fortified monastery originally built by Georgian monks, the Greek Orthodox Church acquired the site when the Georgians ran into financial troubles. Today, a visit to the site is easy. While few monks appear to live at the monastery at present, there is a physical presence. Tourists and pilgrims make the trek, about 2 miles (3 km) from the Old City to the west. The monastery is imposing despite its diminutive size. Thick walls, an even more massive stone framework around the low doorway, radiate defensive power. The monastery contains living quarters, a small shop and area for drinks, a small museum, and the church. While many of the frescos and artworks adorning the walls, pillars, and ceiling of the church have suffered the ravages of time, the church is well maintained and there remains much to admire. The art reflects the Byzantine style prevalent in the Orthodox church and reveals Biblical stories and honors church figures. A small doorway towards the front left side of the church leads to a shrine of celebrating the cross, where a series of images tell the story of how the special tree came to be and eventually came to become the cross of Christ. If driving, one must pass in front of the monastery heading south, turn right on the main road, right again, and immediately turn right into a smaller road fronting a park area. Follow the road to the end and park or go even further onto a dirt track and drive virtually up to the door of the monastery. A quality visit takes about one hour but the site can be visited in 20-30 min.

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Interesting building - but it is not essential to visit this Monsatery in a city with so many attractions
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on September 7, 2018

Not far from the Knesset and Israel Museum and only 3 miles from the Old City this thousand year old monastery (possibly built on the site of an earlier church) has a very interesting story to tell (but very little in English). The chapel is impressive as are the icons. The few staff are...

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Not far from the Knesset and Israel Museum and only 3 miles from the Old City this thousand year old monastery (possibly built on the site of an earlier church) has a very interesting story to tell (but very little in English). The chapel is impressive as are the icons. The few staff are friendly. They have very few visitors. Entrance fee is 15 shekels (3 dollars). The museum could be cleaned up and made so much informative. They have a lot to show off but invest nothing in making it attractive.

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