K K K S TA

The Tomb of Zechariah

  • Mount of Olives, Jerusalem

TripAdvisor Reviews

TripAdvisor ReviewsBased on 32 traveler reviews
New
Closed when we got there
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed 1 day ago

Prior reviews of this site were good, so we were disappointed when we arrived on a Friday morning and could not get in. Therefore, please check the opening hours prior to making your way there.

A hidden gem on the mount of Olives
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on June 16, 2019

We stumbled across this attraction by happy accident, and were really pleased! The guide was incredibly knowledgeable about the heritage and really interpreted it to an excellent standard. The atmosphere was really good and it could be compared to an Indiana Jones movie, though of course it is a religious attraction and is respected...

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We stumbled across this attraction by happy accident, and were really pleased! The guide was incredibly knowledgeable about the heritage and really interpreted it to an excellent standard. The atmosphere was really good and it could be compared to an Indiana Jones movie, though of course it is a religious attraction and is respected as such. I would really recommend this place it is close to the Dominus Flevit church and is also a welcome retreat from the hot Jerusalem sun.

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A real fun troglodyte experioemce
TripAdvisor RatingReviewed on June 12, 2019

This is a real fun troglodyte experience as you fumble your way underground looking for the tombs with your only light being a candle. This catacomb, venerated by Jews since medieval times, is according to Jewish tradition (which has also been adopted by Christians) is believed to be the burial place of Haggai,...

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This is a real fun troglodyte experience as you fumble your way underground looking for the tombs with your only light being a candle. This catacomb, venerated by Jews since medieval times, is according to Jewish tradition (which has also been adopted by Christians) is believed to be the burial place of Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi, the last three Hebrew Bible prophets, These prophets are believed to have lived during the 6th to 5th centuries BC. Archaeologists, however, have dated the three oldest tombs in the catacomb to the 1st century BC, contradicting the popular belief. However, what's 400 years among friends when you can play hide-and-seek in a dark cavern with only a candle for light!

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