K K K S TA

Israel-Jordan Border Crossing

There are three border crossings between Israel and Jordan: the Yitzhak Rabin Terminal/Wadi Araba Crossing, the King Hussein Bridge (Allenby) Terminal and the Jordan River/Sheikh Hussein Crossing. Below get details on each of these crossings so you can choose the one that best fits your needs.

Yitzhak Rabin Terminal/Wadi Araba Crossing

Hours of operation

Sun – Thurs: 6:30 am to 8:00 pm
Fri and Sat: 8:00 am to 8:00 pm
Closed on Yom Kippur and Muslim New Year (Id il Hajira)

Exit fees

From Israel – 100 ILS + 5 ILS surcharge
From Jordan – 8 JD

Facilities and services

Free parking, currency exchange, visas vehicle insurance and registration translation, wheelchair-friendly, vending machines

From Israel

If you’d like to visit Petra and are planning to tour southern Israel at any point during your travels, then you should use this opportunity to cross into Jordan at the southernmost border.  You will most likely encounter the shortest waiting-times, and you have fairly easy access to the border from the major resort cities of Aqaba and Eilat.

Getting to the border
There are regular buses to Eilat from all major cities in Israel (78 ILS from Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and Haifa).  From the central bus station in Eilat, it will be easy to find a taxi to take you to the border.  You may think it is ridiculous when the driver quotes you 50 ILS for the ride, but the best you can do is try to bargain him down to 25-35 ILS.

If you rented a car, you can drive directly to the border terminal, where there is a free parking lot.

If you are on a tight budget and don’t mind walking a bit, you can also get off the bus to Eilat at the stop for Eilot.  The walk to the border is about 1.5 km.  However, you should be wary and prepared if you plan to do this in the summer, when the temperature can exceed 45 C (113 F).

Crossing the border
Once you’ve arrived, you can expect a fairly reasonable border experience.  The terminal is not renovated and air-conditioned like the Taba crossing into Egypt, but it shouldn’t take more than an hour to cross.

From the Jordanian side of the border, you’ll have a few options for getting to Petra.

Getting to Petra or Aqaba
If you’d like to go directly to Petra, there are no buses, so you will have to deal with what travelers call the Jordanian Taxi Mafia, which is a long story.

The short story is that you can get a cab for about 65-75 JD one-way, but many people have reported that unless you exit the terminal as a group, the drivers will force everybody to take separate cars.  So if you’d like to split the fare with a stranger, make sure to chat people up in the terminal and come out looking like best friends.

Alternatively, you can take a cab to the Red Sea port city of Aqaba (5-10 JD), where you can hire a taxi for much cheaper (30 JD one-way, 80 JD round-trip tour) or take a public minibus to Petra (5 JD) from the bus station downtown.  There is no schedule, but they start at around 6:00 am and leave whenever they are full.  The journey takes 1.5-2 hours.

Special notes

Not all nationalities are eligible to receive a Jordanian visa at the border.

Border website: http://www.iaa.gov.il/Rashat/en-US/Borders/Arava/

King Hussein Bridge (Allenby) Terminal

jordan and petra no photo credit (5)_miniThis is the closest border crossing to both Jerusalem and Amman, but depending on your schedule and budget, may or may not be the most convenient route between Israel and Jordan.

Hours of operation

Sun – Thurs: 8:00 am to 12:00 pm (midnight)
Fri and Sat: 8:00 am to 3:00 pm
Closed on Yom Kippur

Exit fee

From Israel – 173 ILS + 5 ILS surcharge
From Jordan – 8 JD

Facilities and services

Currency exchange, visas, cafeteria, restaurant, VAT refund, insurance services, wheelchair-friendly

From Israel

The most important thing to know before trying to cross into Jordan via the King Hussein Bridge, and perhaps the biggest drawback, is that Jordan does not issue visas at this border.  You must apply for a visa at a Jordanian consulate beforehand, and it can take anywhere from 2-15 days to receive it.  In Israel, the Jordanian embassy is in Ramat Gan (+972-3-751-7722).

It is also important to realize that of the three crossings, you will generally encounter the longest waiting time here.  It is the only avenue for Palestinians from the West Bank to travel internationally and has a rigorous security process, especially when entering Israel.

Getting to the border
From Jerusalem, it is about 30 km to the crossing, and you can either take a mini-van taxi from Damascus Gate, a private taxi or Egged bus 961 (drops you off on route 90, about 2 km from border crossing, where you will have to overpay for a taxi or walk).

Crossing the border
Once you have reached the border, you will have to show your passport and pay the exit tax of 176 ILS.  Crossing into Jordan, you should not have much trouble at customs, but you will have to take a 15-20 minute bus ride from the Israeli side of the crossing to the Jordanian side.  The bus costs 5 JD and 1.5 JD per bag.  Some travelers have experience long waiting times for the bus.

Getting to Amman
After you have passed through Jordanian customs, you can either take a bus or mini-bus to Abdali Station in Amman or a private taxi directly to your hotel.

From Jordan

From Amman you can once again take a bus, mini-bus or private taxi.  If you are staying at a hotel or hostel and want to avoid some hassle, you can ask them to arrange transportation for you.

If your trip to Jordan was longer than two days, you will have to pay the exit tax of 8 JD.  At customs, you’ll leave your passport with the border agent and wait on the bus that takes you to the Israeli side.  They will hand everybody’s passports back on the bus before you depart.

Special notes

Be prepared for a long wait on the Israeli side.

Visas must be obtained from the Jordanian embassy prior to crossing this border.

Border website: http://www.iaa.gov.il/Rashat/en-US/Borders/Alenbi/

Jordan River/Sheikh Hussein Crossing

Hours of operation

Sun – Thurs: 6:30 am to 9:00 pm
Fri and Sat: 8:00 am to 7:00 pm
The terminal is closed on Yom Kippur and the Muslim New Year (Id El Hijara)

Exit fee

From Israel – 100 ILS + 5 ILS surcharge
From Jordan – 8 JD

Facilities and services

Currency exchange, cafeteria, duty free (departing Israel), auto insurance, VAT refund, wheelchair-friendly

From Israel

Located 5 km from the Israeli city of Beit She’an, this is the gateway from northern Israel for a trip to Petra.  But unless you’ve made specific plans ahead of time that require you to cross here, it is probably the least convenient and most expensive route between Israel and Jordan.

Getting to the border
Egged bus 961 travels from Jerusalem to Beit She’an, and from there, you can take a taxi to the border, but remember to negotiate.  If you travel by private car, there is parking at the border terminal (24 ILS per day).  The journey takes about two hours.

Crossing the border
After you’ve gone through Israeli customs and paid the fee, you can either walk or take a shuttle to the Jordanian terminal.

Getting to Amman
When you exit the terminal, you will notice that you are more or less standing in the middle of nowhere.  Once you’ve come to grips with this, you have two options for getting to Amman.

A taxi to the city of Irbid will cost about 20 JD, and from there, you can take a bus to Amman.  Alternatively, a taxi directly to Amman may take less time, but it could get pricey, since the driver will also realize that you do not have a lot of options.  That doesn’t mean you should panic and take the first offer you get.  Remember, it’s also in the cab driver’s interest to work out a fare that you are willing to pay.

Border website: http://www.iaa.gov.il/Rashat/en-US/Borders/NeharYarden/

Enjoy your stay in Jordan!

Tours to Jordan from Israel

Join a variety of tours to Jordan from Israel, including a two day tour to Petra and Wadi Rum, a one-day tour to Petra from Eilat and extended Israel tours with stopovers in Jordan.

See all Tours to Jordan here >>
More about travelling to Jordan from Israel >>